How to separate a stuck windsurfing mast

I’ve been windsurfing a few years but I didn’t have my own board. Whenever I wanted to go for a ride, I rented a board from SHQ at Sandringham beach. That was Ok, and I had a lot of fun, but I was confined to a single location. Besides, SHQ only has beginners’ large boards and small sails available for rent, and after some time riding on them started to feel dull.

Therefore, I recently succumbed and bought a second hand board, complete with a mast and a few sails. Now, when I have my own board, I can ride anywhere at any time, and rig whichever sail suits me best. But owning my own board also adds hassle of transporting it, storing, rigging and unrigging.

But probably the most frustrating experience a windsurfer can have is a stuck mast. A modern windsurfing masts are made of glass fiber or carbon fiber and consist of 2 parts: top and bottom, connected together with a ferrule. The parts fit together very tight, and if even a little sand gets into the ferrule, then the mast can become “stuck”, and it will be virtually impossible to separate by hand.

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Focus

Focus

I listen to a few podcasts every week. These are weekly shows I'm subscribed to and listen to every episode. My most favourite one is Freakonomics Radio. I love that show because every week Stephen Dubner and Steve Levitt take ordinary ideas we are so used to that we don’t even pay attention to them, and turn them on their heads. Just like Mythbusters blow things up “for science”, the Freakonomics’ authors turn conventional wisdom inside out, all in the name of economics. I love their show, and I think you too should subscribe and listen to every episode they produce. But if you have time for one episode only, you should listen to the one called “The Upside of Quitting”. In fact, it is so great that even if you have no time at all, you will still have no excuse for not checking it out. In that episode they put forward an unconventional idea that sometimes quitting may be good for you. more ...


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How to install CyanogenMod on Oneplus One

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Oneplus One is powered by Cyanogen OS, an open source OS based on Android Open Source Project (AOSP). Cyanogen OS has its own update cycles, which OnePlus One receives via over-the-air (OTA) updates. When I bought the phone, it had Cyanogen OS 11 installed, based on Android™ 4.4 KitKat. Pretty much when I turned on, it received update to Cyanogen OS 12, based on Android™ 5. The update went without a hitch, and the phone performed flawlessly for a few months… until the next update came through.

12.1-YOG4PAS1N0 is Cyanogen OS 12.1 based on Android™ 5.1.1. Unfortunately, once that update installed on my OnePlus One, it rendered the phone practically unusable. The problems included LTE connection dropping out, random freezes and reboots, application crashing, you name it… And after a couple weeks I had enough and decided to do something about that. So, I said goodbye to Cyanogen OS and hello to CyanogenMod Nightly Builds. more ...